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The Rise and Fall of the Great Equalizer: How Public Education Shaped American Society and Culture



School: The Story of American Public Education downloads torrent




If you are interested in learning more about the history of public education in America, you might want to check out this book by Sarah Mondale. School: The Story of American Public Education is a comprehensive and engaging account of how public schools have evolved over time, from their origins in the colonial era to their current challenges and opportunities in the 21st century. In this article, we will give you an overview of what the book covers, why you should read it, and how you can download it legally and easily.




School: The Story of American Public Education downloads torrent



The origins of public education in America




Public education is one of the most important institutions in American society. It affects millions of students, teachers, parents, and citizens every year. But how did it start? And what were its goals and values?


The book traces the roots of public education back to the common school movement in the early 19th century. This movement was led by reformers like Horace Mann, who advocated for free, universal, nonsectarian, and democratic schooling for all children. They believed that public education was essential for creating a literate, moral, and civic-minded citizenry.


The book also explores how public education was influenced by the progressive era in the late 19th and early 20th century. This era was marked by social changes such as industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and reform movements. Progressive educators like John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Jane Addams promoted new ideas and methods for teaching and learning that emphasized child-centeredness, experiential learning, social justice, and community involvement.


The challenges and reforms of the 20th century




Public education in America has faced many challenges and changes throughout the 20th century. The book examines how public schools have responded to various issues and trends that have shaped American society and culture.


One of the most significant issues was racial segregation and discrimination. The book covers the landmark Supreme Court case of Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, which declared that separate but equal schools were unconstitutional. It also discusses the subsequent struggles and efforts to desegregate and integrate public schools, such as the Little Rock Nine, the busing controversy, and the multicultural education movement.


Another major issue was immigration and diversity. The book explores how public schools have dealt with the influx of immigrants and refugees from different countries and cultures, especially in the late 20th and early 21st century. It also analyzes how public schools have addressed the needs and rights of various groups of students, such as English language learners, special education students, gifted and talented students, and LGBTQ+ students.


A third important issue was globalization and standardization. The book investigates how public schools have adapted to the changing demands and expectations of the global economy and society. It also evaluates how public schools have implemented various reforms and initiatives to improve student achievement and accountability, such as the No Child Left Behind Act, the Common Core State Standards, and the standardized testing movement.


The rise and fall of the "great equalizer"




Public education in America has often been seen as the "great equalizer" that can provide equal opportunity and social mobility for all students, regardless of their background or circumstances. The book explores how this ideal has been realized or challenged in different periods and contexts.


The book shows how public education has contributed to the advancement and empowerment of many groups of people, such as women, African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and immigrants. It also highlights how public education has fostered a sense of national identity and civic participation among Americans.


However, the book also reveals how public education has failed or harmed many students and communities, especially those who are poor, marginalized, or oppressed. It also exposes how public education has reproduced or reinforced social inequalities and injustices in American society.


The current state and future prospects of public education




Public education in America is facing unprecedented challenges and opportunities in the 21st century. The book examines how public schools are coping with the current situation and what they can do to prepare for the future.


One of the most pressing challenges is the COVID-19 pandemic, which has disrupted the normal functioning of public schools since early 2020. The book explores how public schools have shifted to online or hybrid learning models, how they have supported students' academic, social, and emotional well-being, and how they have dealt with the health and safety risks of reopening.


Another major challenge is technology, which has transformed the way people communicate, learn, work, and live. The book investigates how public schools have integrated technology into their curriculum, instruction, assessment, and administration. It also assesses how public schools have balanced the benefits and drawbacks of technology use, such as enhancing access and engagement versus creating distraction and inequality.


A third significant challenge is diversity, which has increased the complexity and richness of American society and culture. The book evaluates how public schools have embraced diversity as an asset and a resource for learning. It also examines how public schools have promoted equity and inclusion for all students and staff.


A fourth important challenge is accountability, which has raised the stakes and standards for public schools. The book reviews how public schools have measured their performance and quality using various indicators and criteria. It also critiques how public schools have faced pressure and competition from external forces such as policymakers, parents, media, businesses, nonprofits, charter schools, private schools, and homeschooling.


The benefits of reading the book




Now that you have a general idea of what the book is about, you might be wondering why you should read it. What are the benefits of reading this book? Here are some reasons why you should read School: The Story of American Public Education.


The historical insights and perspectives




One of the main benefits of reading this book is that it provides a comprehensive and engaging history of public education in America. You will learn about:


The stories and voices of teachers and students




The book showcases the experiences and opinions of those who lived through public education in different times and places. You will hear from teachers and students who share their joys and sorrows, hopes and fears, achievements and struggles in public schools. You will also see how teachers and students have influenced or resisted public education reforms and initiatives.


The analysis and critique The PDF and print versions




If you prefer to read the book in a physical format, you can download or print it as a PDF or hard copy. You can use websites like https://www.pdfdrive.com/ or https://www.scribd.com/ to find and download PDF versions of the book. You can also use websites like https://www.printfriendly.com/ or https://www.printwhatyoulike.com/ to print the book as a hard copy. By using these websites, you can save paper and ink by customizing the layout and content of the book.


Conclusion




In conclusion, School: The Story of American Public Education is a book that you should read if you want to learn more about the history of public education in America. The book provides a comprehensive and engaging account of how public schools have evolved over time, from their origins in the colonial era to their current challenges and opportunities in the 21st century. The book also provides historical insights and perspectives, educational implications and applications, and legal and ethical considerations for downloading the book. You can download the book legally and easily by visiting the official website and publisher, borrowing or purchasing it from libraries or bookstores, or using apps or websites to access it on different devices or formats. We hope that this article has given you an overview of what the book covers, why you should read it, and how you can download it.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about the book and the article:


Q: Who is the author of the book?




A: The author of the book is Sarah Mondale, a former public school teacher and filmmaker. She is also the director and co-producer of the PBS documentary series that accompanies the book.


Q: When was the book published?




A: The book was published in 2001 by Beacon Press. It was updated and revised in 2018 with a new introduction by Diane Ravitch.


Q: How long is the book?




A: The book is 368 pages long. It has four parts, each covering a different period of public education history: Part One: The Common School (1770-1890), Part Two: As American as Public School (1900-1950), Part Three: Equality (1950-1980), and Part Four: The Bottom Line (1980-Present).


Q: How can I watch the documentary series?




A: You can watch the documentary series on PBS at https://www.pbs.org/video/school-the-story-of-american-public-education-episode-1-the-common-school-1770-1890/ . You can also buy the DVD at https://shop.pbs.org/school-the-story-of-american-public-education-dvd/product/SCHL601 . The documentary series has four episodes, each corresponding to a part of the book.


Q: How can I contact the author?




A: You can contact the author by visiting her website at https://www.sarahmondale.com/ . There you can find more information about her work, biography, and contact details. 71b2f0854b


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